Incident management

The objective of incident management is to restore the normal operation of services as quickly as possible and to minimize the negative impact on activities.

Incidents can be separated into two groups: minor incidents and major incidents

Minor incidents

The MUHC TCC staff is capable of resolving all minor incidents. These incidents do not require the initiation of a C2 ticket. They must however be entered in the data sheet and stored in the videoconferencing database. Minor incidents include the following:

  • Any incident resolved on the first call.
  • Simple sound-related incidents (e.g.: mute button, etc.).
  • Simple PC-related incidents (screen turned off, etc.).
  • Incidents related to real-time usage of medical devices in videoconferencing sessions.

Major incidents

The MUHC TCC technical staff is capable of dealing with minor and major incidents. All major incidents lead to the initiation of a C2 ticket without fail. Major incidents include the following:

  • Incidents on the local network.
  • Incidents on the remote network.
  • Incidents on the RITM.
  • Incidents involving a codec.
  • Audio/video incidents.
  • Incidents on one of bridges.
  • Incidents concerning telehealth applications.
  • Equipment failure:
    • Malfunctioning of devices.
    • Any incident that was not resolved on level I or on the first call.
    • Packet loss on the network.
    • Incorrect configuration while installing the equipment.

Responsibility at the technical support level

The objective of incident management is to restore the normal operation of services as quickly as possible and to minimize the negative impact on activities.

Incidents can be separated into two groups: minor incidents and major incidents

To ensure optimal technical support to RUIS McGill users who face a technical problem with videoconferencing equipment, the latter should immediately contact the coordinator of teleconsultation activities who acts as a liaison between users and the MUHC TCC technical support.

Level 1

The main activities are as follows:

  • Receiving requests for assistance by phone with a single entry point (MUHC TCC).
  • Attaching the unique identification code of the request number to the assistance requests.
  • Performing a first level diagnosis to determine the source of the problem.
  • Assigning requests to second level resources if the problem could not be solved.
  • Doing follow-ups to ensure that all requests are processed.
  • Preparing follow-up reports.

Level 2

In case of non-resolution of a first level diagnosis, the telehealth business analyst of the MUHC IT department will take over the assistance request. He will carry out more detailed checks within the RITM network in collaboration with partners like SOGIQUE or suppliers if required.

Level 3

In case of general failure (non-resolution of the problem), the telehealth business analyst of the MUHC IT department will coordinate the required technical resources of external partners (suppliers, SOGIQUE, TCR, institution) until the problem is finally resolved. This could require a change in the IP address programming code, and even the replacement of components.

Important points

1. Minor incidents – The allocation of human resources to various minor incidents is ensured by technical staff that is remotely supported by the event coordinators of the MUHC TCC.

2. Major incidents – The allocation of human resources to various major incidents is ensured both by the chief telehealth technician and the IT technician of the MUHC TCC.

3. The IT technician of the MUHC TCC is responsible for analyzing recurring incidents with the same symptoms (problems) and must propose remedial action.

4. A detailed report must be prepared for all major incidents. The report should include the organizational and clinical repercussions of the incident.

Troubleshooting during a telehealth session

The objective of incident management is to restore the normal operation of services as quickly as possible and to minimize the negative impact on activities.

Incidents can be separated into two groups: minor incidents and major incidents

In order to ensure better handling of technical difficulties with telehealth systems, the below steps should be followed when a transmission or operating problem in the telehealth system arises during a session in real (synchronous) time:

Step 1

The site where the problem occurs immediately alerts the other sites about it.

Step 2

The person acting as “technical contact” or “autonomous user” at the requester site:

  • explains the situation to the patient and requests him to wait while one tries to identify the cause of the problem and solve it;
  • pauses the video and audio systems of the videoconference;
  • contacts the MUHC TCC, which gets in touch with the technician at the supplier site and the telehealth technician of the MUHC TCC;

Step 3

The person acting as “technical contact” or technician at the supplier site:

  • explains the situation to the health care professional and requests him to wait while one tries to identify the cause of the problem and solve it;
  • assesses the situation along with the telehealth technician of the MUHC TCC, in order to determine the cause of the technical problem and immediately passes on the information to the requester site.

Step 4

If the problem cannot be solved, all the participating sites “connected” to the session should restart their system. The national videoconferencing bridge can perform this operation for “multipoint” sessions. In the case of “point to point” sessions, it is the telehealth technician of the MUHC TCC who can perform this operation.

Step 5

If the technical problem cannot be solved within 15 to 30 minutes, the health care professional at the supplier site or the person acting as the “clinical contact” who organizes the session at the requester site explains to the patient that due of the nature of the technical complications, more time will be needed to solve them. Whenever possible, the patient is moved away from the equipment. Such a possibility should be explained before the consent form is signed.

Step 6

The telehealth technician of the MUHC TCC works with the requester site and carries out a series of diagnostic tests. If it is not possible to solve the problem within 15 to 30 minutes, he recommends the cancellation of the session.

Step 7

The health care professional or the coordinator at the requester site explains the situation to the patient if the health care professional at the supplier site is unable to speak directly to the latter.

Step 8

The coordinator at the requester site contacts the patients who should have actually taken part in this very session to inform them about the situation.

Step 9

The clinical coordinator works with the requester site if need be to take a new appointment with the patient.

Step 10

After initiating a C2 eTicket, the technical team of the MUHC TCC and the technical support staff at the requester site work in collaboration with “technical” partners involved in the process of the teleconsultation session (e.g.: SOGIQUE, TCR, TCN, private suppliers such as Bell) to solve the problem, according to the “outage management” procedure established in each of the institutions in the CvSSS. Once the problem is solved, the clinical coordinator is informed of the situation.

Step 11

Once the problem is solved, the telehealth technician who was primarily in charge of support prepares an incident report; he communicates the resolution of the problem to his colleagues, the event coordinators of the MUHC TCC and the clinical coordinator.

Step 12

At each period of the fiscal calendar, the members of the MUHC TCC convey statistical data on minor and major incidents to the immediate superior for circulation to partners of the RUIS McGill. If an event had repercussions on the safety of a patient, the manager of the MUHC TCC must be informed about it immediately.